Building Upon a Foundation of Sound Farriery

By Jeff Cota posted on January 2, 2020 | Posted in Business Practices, Clients, Disciplines & Breeds, Diseases, Lamenesses, Shoeing, Therapeutic Shoeing, Trimming

C-Cross Farriers advocate for the horse and each other for a successful multi-farrier practice

A multi-farrier practice was not on Jason Critton’s radar 10 years ago when he was thumbing through the pages of the May/June issue of American Farriers Journal. In fact, it was a foreign concept.

“Reading the ‘Shoeing for a Living’ with Florida farrier James Gilchrist was the first time that I’d even heard of a multi-farrier practice in the United States,” he says. “I thought, ‘Man, that’s cool.’”

Fast forward a decade later and Critton has established a highly successful seven-member team under his family’s brand, C-Cross Farriers.

                          Farrier Takeaways

  • Trimming the foot using the frog and sole planes have resulted in vastly improved feet and reduced the frequency of issues such as quarter cracks and sheared heels.
  • To help ensure a healthy foot, the hoof capsule should mirror the coronary band and, by extension, the coffin bone.
  • When trimming and shoeing horses, Jason Critton builds mechanics into the feet and shoes to mimic wear. These modifications provide an advantage to gain control of the toe and hold


The team, based in Sedalia, Colo., consists of Jason Critton, CJF, TE; his wife Dawn Marie Critton, PhD; Jaime Venegas, CJF; Jake Woirhaye, CJF; Anthony Casso, CJF; Cord Larson, CF; and Turner Kinkaid, a first-year associate. The entire team provides hoof-care for between 800 and 850 horses. The horses and disciplines range from backyard to high-level sport horses.


On this “Shoeing for a Living” Day, Critton and his team discusses what has made them successful both in and out of the barnType your paragraph here.

C-Cross Farrier Services, Inc.